Editorial

Curtis must use all available resources during transition

As Allie Curtis begins transitioning into the role of Student Association president, she must make sure to use all her available resources to help better the student government.

In the next few weeks, Curtis will spend the majority of her transition learning from current President Dylan Lustig, the only student left on campus who has held the position. Because he is the most recent SA president, it makes sense for him to show Curtis the ropes. But Curtis must reach out to former SA presidents who can also give her insight and knowledge about how to be an effective defender of the students.

It is also important for Curtis to continue learning about SA’s history to avoid mistakes of previous administrations. Certainly there are new problems facing students today, but there are also some perennial problems, such as organization funding. By going back five or 10 years, Curtis can see how former administrations dealt with these issues.

As SA president, Curtis needs to focus on the students and their needs. Learning about the student government’s internal workings and systems has kept former presidents, including Lustig, from focusing on students despite how much they have said they want to.

Though Curtis has served as vice president and may know some internal aspects of the presidency, there will always be more to learn. To adequately focus on the students, Curtis needs to learn all she can about the inner workings before she officially takes the position.

To make sure Curtis accomplishes her goals, she needs to articulate them clearly and fluently. She needs to communicate them with the heads of the committees, who will be greatly responsible for carrying out her plans. Curtis also needs to develop working relationships with all committee heads so they will respect her as their new leader.

Curtis has a huge task in front of her: leading the student body. To adequately do so, Curtis must learn as much as possible before taking over the reins in January.

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